Breakout Sessions

Breakout Session 1 (10:15am – 11:15am)

Golden Globes & the Media Industry

Presenter: Alexis Lopez ’19

Denison University

Location: Burton Morgan 216

How many Latinx were nominated for the Oscars? How many are in the media? Why is there little Latinx representation in the media? Why is it mostly for stereotypical roles? This presentation will answer these questions and highlight the lack of diversity in media. We will also discuss what we can do to bring change so that Latinx and other minorities have proper representation.

 

A Constructive Assessment of the Xicana & Latin American Feminist Movement

Presenters: Omar Vargas ‘16, Jennifer Park ‘17 & Hanh Ly Kieu Pham ’18

Denison University

Location: Burton Morgan 219

Latin American feminism and Xicana feminism have roots that extend to the early 19th century but have diverged in focus and perspective based on location and environment. This workshop aims to discuss both movements and understand the similarities and differences. We will be looking at each movement through topics such as political, economic and reproductive rights, and examine each movements ideologies and philosophies. We will also talk about women’s rights and how they are being discussed through a global perspective, incorporating the efforts done by the United Nations and other countries through a series of international laws and conventions.

 

Persistence and Post-College Transitions: What does data tell us and what are your concerns?

Presenters: Michele Doran & Dr. Kirsten Fox, Center for Career Exploration

Denison University

Location: Burton Morgan 220

This session will provide a snapshot of data examining both the Latinx student population at Denison University as well as national trends. Data related to persistence in undergraduate programs as well as transitions from college to the work force will be explored.  A large part of this presentation will include interactive, roundtable discussions to allow for conversations centered on concerns, questions and overall experiences regarding transitions after graduation.

 

Transfronterizo/Transborder: A Creative Element

Presenter: Juan Armando Rojas Joo, Assoc. Professor of Modern Foreign Languages

Ohio Wesleyan University 

Location: Burton Morgan 218

A reflection on being transborder / transfronterizo, un ser más allá de las fronteras, and how this becomes a creative element as it allows me/you/us to explore new and creative ways of thinking and expression.

Breakout Session 2 (11:30am – 12:30pm)

The Complexity of Identity: Who am I? 

Presenters: Cheyenne Evans ’16 & Anissa Gamboa ‘17 

Denison University

Location: Burton Morgan 216

This session will talk about Latinx who have been struggling to find their identity. What if you live in a community where there are no other Latinx, such as in rural America? How do you find your identity? If you have more than one identity, do you keep both identities or do you give one up? What if you grew up in a bi-racial  household? How do you navigate college? Different questions and student research will be presented to allow for an open discussion of one’s identity.

 

Latin Queerness in the Midwest 

Presenter: Charles Édouard St-Georges, Asst. Professor of Modern Languages & Queer Studies

Denison University 

Location: Burton Morgan Lecture Hall 115 

Over the decades, the LGBTQIA community has expanded its alphabet soup of acronyms in order to be more inclusive, but what are the implications for a Latinx community where gender and sexual identities are constituted differently, and where intersectionality complicates our relationship with “mainstream” queer communities in the Midwest (especially on college campuses)? This interactive workshop will include film clips, group discussions, anonymous written participation, and voluntary verbal participation in activities that are designed to  develop a working vocabulary for speaking about and thinking through the complexities behind identity labels such as “gay” and “Latinx” that are often taken at face value and used in reductionist ways, both inside and outside the communities they claim to describe.

 

Student-Staff Relationships: Community Coordinators and Student Leaders at Oberlin College

Presenters: Julio Reyes , Latinx Community Coordinator, Xavier Tirado & Samantha Blake Co-Chair of La Alianza Latinx

Oberlin College

Location: Burton Morgan 220

In this interactive presentation, participants will learn more about the structure of the Multicultural Resource Center at Oberlin College. Specifically we will talk about the impacts of a community-focused lens that emphasizes relationship building with students and other campus partners. What makes Oberlin unique? How do our titles as Community Coordinators, rather than program coordinators, affect student-staff interactions and the community we create for one another on campus. Student leaders will also share their experiences working with staff members.

Breakout Session 3 (2:30pm – 3:30pm)

Using ‘The Master’s Tools’?: Institutionalizing Diversity

Presenter: Dr. Ivonne Garcia, Associate Provost

Kenyon College

Location: Burton Morgan Lecture Hall 115

While Dr. García’s mini-keynote will address the “why” we need to be part of institutional diversity as Latinx, the breakout session/workshop will be aimed at having students discuss the value and the ways of institutionalizing diversity at our various institutions, or to “work with the master’s tools.”

 

Fact or Fiction: The 2016 Election

Presenter: J. Davide Rangel-Hernández ’16

Denison University

Location: Burton Morgan 220

My Political Science professor once told me that politics is the biggest reality tv show in the world. Was he right or was he exaggerating? This program will present the audience outrageous statements that have been made during the election process and the audience will guess whether they are fact or fiction, followed by a discussion about the statements.

 

Re-Racing Latinidad: Historical and Contemporary Perspectives on Afro-Latin American and Afro-Latinx Identity in the United States

Presenters: Lauren Hammond, Asst. Professor of History & Michael Guerrero ’16

Denison University

Location: Burton Morgan 218

Today it is “common knowledge” that Latinx have outpaced Black Americans as the largest minority group in the United States; yet if we look beyond the surface, we can see that this claim is rooted in the false premise that Black and Latinx are mutually exclusive identities. In this discussion session, co-facilitated by Michael Guerrero and Dr. Lauren Hammond, participants will explore the historical and contemporary experiences of Afro-Latin American migrants and Afro-Latinx in the U.S. as they wrestle with questions like: What does it mean to be Afro-Latin American or Afro-Latinx in the U.S? Should Afro-Latin Americans and Afro-Latinx be more vocal about the complexity of their identity? How are the experiences of Afro-Latinx similar to and different from those of other Latinx, African-Americans, and other U.S.-born Blacks? Where are Afro-Latin Americans and Afro-Latinx in the media?