How to access library databases while you’re away

Remember: No matter where you are during Spring Break, as long as you’ve got Internet access, you’ve got full access to the library’s many databases.

Whether you access the databases through the catalog or the databases/online resources page, all  you need to do is authenticate by providing your name and Denison ID number. This is the 14-digit number on the back of your ID card that starts with 251080, and then ends with the 8 digits that make up your D-number.

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Warren Commission Report available online

In light of the upcoming 50th anniversary of the assassination of President John F. Kennedy, it seems worth noting that the official, digital version of the Warren Commission Report is accessible to the public via the U.S. Government Printing Office’s Federal Digital System (FDsys). One can also access flight deck audio recordings of Air Force One pilots on the post-assassination flight from Dallas to Andrews Air Force Base.

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Accessing government information during the federal government shutdown

As of today (October 2nd), the following sites are down:

U.S. Census Bureau

Library of Congress

National Center for Education Statistics

U.S. Geological Survey

Sites that are still live (but not necessarily being updated) include:

Bureau of Justice Statistics

Bureau of Labor Statistics

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (including the National Center for Health Statistics)

FDsys (the Government Printing Office’s Federal Digital System)

State Department

Thomas  (legislative information from Congress)

For those of you searching for government information and running into unavailable Web sites, all hope is not lost!

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Interesting article about Lincoln assassination

For the history buffs and/or Lincoln aficianodos out there, the Winter 2013 edition of Army History, a magazine published by the U.S. Army, includes a fascinating article on the trial of the Lincoln assassination conspirators by Military Commission. This is but one of the many government documents that the library provides access to, both in print and electronically.

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Some very powerful research tools

As members of the Denison community, we have at our disposal some very powerful research tools. I was reminded of this when I heard President Obama invoke Seneca Falls, Selma and Stonewall in his inauguration address, and wondered about its origins. Was Obama the first to publicly link these historic events by invoking them in the same sentence?

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Learn more about the National Security Archive

The Digital National Security Archive is a great resource for declassified U.S. government documents, providing researchers with access to primary source materials on U.S. policy from the post-World War II era through the 21st century. A recent blog post sheds light on the  history of the National Security Archive, including its groundbreaking work on the Cuban Missile Crisis.

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Election season sites/resources

With the November elections approaching fairly soon, here are some good sites to learn about the candidates and the issues:

ProCon.org’s 2012 Presidential Election site provides research on the U.S. presidential candidates and their views on 61 issues, so that you can find out which candidate you agree with on most of them.

Council on Foreign Relations’ Campaign 2012 and Foreign Policy Issues examines the foreign policy dimensions of the presidential race, tracking candidates’ positions and offering insight on the top issues.

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How to access library databases while you’re away

Remember: No matter where you are during Spring Break, as long as you’ve got Internet access, you’ve got full access to the library’s many databases.

Whether you access the databases through the catalog or the online resources page, all  you need to do is authenticate by providing your name and Denison ID number. This is the 14-digit number on the back of your ID card that starts with 251080, and then ends with the 8 digits that make up your D-number.

Continue Reading