Final Thoughts

While searching for jobs over the past couple of months, it has occurred to me how much I’ve learned from this project. Mainly, I learned that it doesn’t matter (that much) what you majored in. What matters is how you use that major. English degrees can be used as gateways to completely different jobs like helicopter cockpit designer, lawyer, FBI agent, and emergency planner.

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Interview Observations

After reviewing the videos on iMovie in order to start making a collaborative video for the English department and interviewing more people after these reviews, there are certain ideas that I have noticed almost every alumni touches on. The most common shared idea is that in the job market, it doesn’t matter what you major in, but how you use your major to sell your skill sets.

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Video Archiving Updates

For the last two weeks, I have been researching video editing and archiving software. While I had once been quite hopeful about Premiere Pro, an Adobe video editing software, because of its supposed speech analysis abilities, I was disappointed to find the feature was removed from the newest versions and no previous versions could be downloaded.

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Professionalism and the Travelling Mattress Sale

For the last year, I have been working as an order form writer for a friend who runs a business selling mattresses out of high school gyms as a form of fundraiser. This incredibly odd concept is difficult to explain to the people surrounding the different high schools we work in each weekend and as a result, it is a challenge to convince people that this is a legitimate business and not the questionable, possible pyramid scheme it seems to be.

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College and Professional Choices

Denison payments are due and it’s time for the panic to set in. I’m panicking that I might not have enough money to finish and my twin little brothers are panicking about starting their freshman year and paying for the years to come. One of whom, who I am going to call Jacob for the sake of his anonymity, worried so much he debated not going at all.

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The Case of the Foreman in Orange is the New Black

The new season of the popular Netflix show, Orange is the New Black, saw Litchfield Penitentiary undergo a drastic change in management. While Litchfield was originally to be closed due to financial problems, it was “saved” by the corporation MCC, Management and Corrections Corporation. This change resulted in a new hierarchy of power.

Prior to MCC’s takeover, Joe Caputo was the warden of Litchfield and the equivalent of C.

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The Literature Question Guilt Trip

One of the consistent aspects of the interviews we have conducted is the way in which people answer the question about how literature impacts their lives today. Almost every interviewee said that they did not have time to read literature. Many people are so overwhelmed by work that they simply say they are unable to spend any time reading, though all interviewees express a desire to read more.

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Making a New Myth about English Majors

The myth that English majors have no prospects in the job market is more than pervasive, it has become the framework for the way people studying English talk about their choice in major, that is to say defensively. Students don’t talk about studying English without justifying their choice, explaining their career plan, or in some way tackling the elephant that pops up in every room the moment majoring in English is brought up, the question “What are you going to do with a degree in English?”

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The Inevitable Collapse of Capitalism in the U.S.

Part One of Mills’s book, White Collar explains the complicated economic history of the United States up until 1951. In this section, Mills reveals the way the nation of small entrepreneurs from the beginning of U.S. history became white-collar workers for large corporations. This history is extremely detailed and complicated so in order to explain the whole thing in one concise blog post, I will explain the whole thing through one analogy about dominoes.

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Planning for the Future: How White-Collar Society Impacts Career Decisions

I got my first “C” in fourth grade and it was devastating. A “C” was practically like an “F” to me, a kid who had never gotten anything lower than a 95% on any assignment, ever. I never got anything lower than an “A” because if I didn’t get an “A” on every assignment then I would have bad grades and if I did that, I wouldn’t be prepared for middle school and then high school.

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