Up Your Game with Google

This week ETS shares a top 5 list of Gmail and Drive “must know” features that could make your digital life easier. Our top 5 are Gmail templates, confidential mode, delayed sending, blocking downloading, printing, and copying, named revisions, and a bonus tip. (Yes, this makes 6, but, hey, everyone needs a bonus.) Take a look at our blog post “Up Your Game with Google” for details.

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Give Your Fingers a Rest. Try Voice Typing

We are at that time of the academic year when we feel pressed for time. Voice Typing may offer you a time saving solution. We generally speak faster than we type, even if we possess pretty good typing skills. The Voice Typing tool allows you to dictate and format in Google Docs and in the speaker notes section of Google Slides.

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Tidbit – From the Bright Side Project

While the pandemic changed the fabric of higher education and life in general, people had to find a way to keep going. Students kept learning. Teachers kept teaching. Parents kept parenting. It was not always pretty. Often it was (and is) downright exhausting. Many of us experienced lengthy periods of burnout. Many still struggle finding motivation. Human resilience shone through.

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Tech – Do You or Your Students Suffer from Tired, Burning Eyes Due Too Much Screen Time? Use Lexend Fonts!!

Dr. Bonnie Shaver-Troup, an educational therapist, began the Lexend Project in 2000 and teamed up with the typeface designer Thomas Jockin and Google to produce the free Lexend fonts. These fonts were designed initially to support struggling readers and those with dyslexia. However, along the way research has found that these fonts reduce visual stress for everyone and therefore, improve reading performance.

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Tech – Let’s get social with social annotation

Social annotation brings the individual experience of marking up a text with highlights, notes and questions to a shared online space where individuals can now share their mark ups and commentary as well as respond to each other’s comments and questions.To learn more about social annotation and how it can kick start a class discussion and allow you to see how students are making sense of a digital text (including images, video and audio files) before class, check out this EdTech Blog post, “Let’s Get Social”.

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Tech – Freeing Yourself From Cables in the Classroom

Tired of being chained to the instructor podium while presenting from your laptop or tablet? Want to give students an opportunity to easily share their work with the class? Give the Kramer VIA a try. The VIA device will allow you to securely connect wirelessly from anywhere in the room. Check out this post “Connecting to a Classroom VIA Display Device” on our EdTech Blog for more details.

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Tech – Introducing Learning Management System (LMS)

In case you have not heard the news, a new Learning Management System (LMS) will be coming to Denison beginning Fall 2022.  The ITC, the Office of the Provost, and ITS have been working together to ensure Denison faculty are involved in the process of selecting a LMS that works best for the university. Demos of three systems, Canvas, D2L Brightspace, and OpenLMS (Moodle-based), will be held the second and fourth weeks of January.

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Tech – Workshop: “Seeing Through Your Text with Voyant: Low Barrier Text Analysis in the Classroom”

On Saturday, December 4, the Ohio Five CODEX team, in collaboration with Denison ETS and the Library, hosted a workshop on computational text analysis and using a tool call Voyant. Most of the faculty participating in the workshop left with ideas on how they can use this digital tool to have students conduct distance reading on their texts.

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Tech – Using tablet capture to save time

Ever want to communicate a quick idea or demonstration to your students outside of class, but an email format was cumbersome? Have access to a tablet, such as an iPad? Consider making a quick tablet capture voice-over video. Unlike a talking-head video made in something like Loom, with an iPad connected to a desktop you can create a quick voice-over video to:

  • share a quick example that may involve drawings or computations
  • point out key parts of a reading or diagram
  • provide verbal feedback on students’ work

This excellent website from the University of Pittsburgh instructs how to create video capture on a variety of tablets and systems.

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